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CO2 emissions of shipping
A global concern

The international shipping industry endorses the spirit and objectives of the Paris COP21 agreement on climate change. Shipping, together with all other industry sectors, must be part of the global solution. The shipping industry is committed to developing CO2 reductions across the world merchant fleet that are both ambitious and realistic. The EU can support this commitment by pursuing the following approach:

 

Hold the global course charted by the European Commission

European-UnionIn 2011, the European Commission set out a clear plan to curb CO2 emissions from shipping. It charted a course towards a global solution developed by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), which is the United Nations’ specialised agency with responsibility, amongst others, for the prevention of environmental pollution of ships. Significant progress has been made since 2011, but the end of the journey has not been reached yet. Holding the charted course is however the best way of achieving results. Including shipping in a regional EU scheme, such as the Emission Trading Scheme (ETS), even as a means to exert pressure on the IMO, would stop progress on the much-needed global framework.

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Track progress through data collection

SmedegaardThe EU has shown leadership when implementing its CO2 strategy for shipping. The first step consists of a regulation to monitor, report and verify (MRV) CO2 emissions of shipping, which was adopted in 2015. In 2017, shipowners will have to submit a CO2 monitoring plan to external verifiers and the actual monitoring and reporting will start in 2018. When we have a real understanding of the emissions, we can then set realistic targets. In April this year, the IMO has agreed upon a global data collection system which will formalised in October. Our focus should now be on ensuring the proper implementation of the MRV regulation and make certain that the regulation is aligned with the IMO framework. This will ensure that European shipping will be covered by a single system, in an efficient manner without double work”, Niels Smedegaard, ECSA President.

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Steer clear of the EU Emission Trading Scheme

fto patrickverhoeven“We are confident that the IMO will reach a comprehensive global agreement for maritime emissions. This is good news because there simply is no credible alternative. Just imagine what would happen if shipping would be included in the EU Emission Trading System. Such a regional measure would have a directly distorting impact on European operators. It would lead to carbon leakage as ships would start to avoid calling at EU ports. It would also gravely hurt the European short sea shipping sector, which would again be faced with an ‘EU only’ system”, Patrick Verhoeven, ECSA Secretary General.

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Work in trusted partnership at IMO

IMOThe IMO has been taking steps to mitigate climate change for two decades and achieved in 2011 the first binding global agreement to reduce CO2 emissions from an industry sector. This agreement includes the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) for new ships and the Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP), which entered into force in 2013. Both provide meaningful and lasting improvements in energy efficiency and reduce the amount of fuel required for ship operations. Next to the recent decision on a global data collection system, the IMO has agreed in April 2016 to continue work on improving the EEDI and to start an in-depth discussion on a workplan and timetable to establish a CO2 reduction commitment for international shipping. The EU should foster these encouraging signs of progress at IMO and work in trust with its global partners to make the global data collection system and the definition and implementation of the sector’s fair share work, all according to the original voyage plan agreed in 2011.

IMO

 

 

 

 

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Facts and Figures

 

Facts Figures

ECSA-co2

 

 

 

 

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IMO achievements on GHG emissions from international shipping 2003

IMO MEPC gets a mandate to develop mechanisms to achieve reduction of GHG emissions from international shipping.


2011

Adoption of mandatory technical and operational measures (EEDI and SEEMP) via amendments to MARPOL Convention - all ships built after 2025 will be at least 30% more CO2 efficient than in the 2000s.

 

2013

Global entry into force of MARPOL amendments.

 

2014

Third IMO study on GHG emissions of ships published - over 10% CO2 reduction by entire sector (2007-2012).

 

2015

Implementation of EEDI Phase One - all new ships now10% more efficient.

 

2016

  • Approval and adoption of mandatory global CO2 data collection system

  • Review of the EEDI goals

  • Work on CO2 reduction commitments for international shipping sector, in response to Paris Agreement.